Omoni Oboli Calls Out Critic For Calling Her Movie "Bad"

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Omoni-Oboli

Actress and Producer, Omoni Oboli, has called out critic, Wilfred Okiche for displaying what she calls “the crab mentality.”

Oboli came for the critic after he published a mini review of her film, “Wives on Strike” on Y! Naija’s list of the 10 worst films to have been released in Nollywood in 2016.

According to the critic, while the movie deserved credit for attempting to tackle a worthy cause in child marriage, it was a disappointing attempt. “…her movies are bad, truth be told and Wives on strike is only the latest in a line that started with Being Mrs. Elliot,” Okiche wrote in his review.

The actress/writer/producer/director, did not take the criticism very kindly, and came for the critic, via a post on her Instagram page. “NIGERIANS AND THE CRAB MENTALITY AGAIN! I usually won’t do this but I guess this caught me on the wrong side today! Sometimes we let rubbish go on for too long and it doesn’t even help any of us,” she wrote of Okiche’s comments. “To all naysayers, put your money where your mouth is: produce your own film so you can show us how to do better! You want publicity Wilfred? there! Enjoy it,” she concluded.

NIGERIANS AND THE CRAB MENTALITY AGAIN! I usually won’t do this but I guess this caught me on the wrong side today! Sometimes we let rubbish go on for too long and it doesn’t even help any of us! I work hard, I really do! If I will say so myself, I am an AMAZING writer and a great producer and director! There! I said it! Deal with it! So apparently, Wilfred Okichie of @ynaija is smarter than hundreds of thousands of you who have watched my movies and enjoyed it. #BeingMrsElliott was opening film in different film festivals and is still getting great reviews! #TheFirstLady was audience choice award at the last Nollywood Week Festival in Paris. #WivesOnStrike, don’t even get me started on that one! Awards and recognition galore! After all is said and done, my greatest reward is the love and appreciation of you my #Omonifam. That’s all I need and I will keep doing the movies you love. On that note, watch out for #OkaforsLaw It will blow your minds! To all naysayers, put your money where your mouth is: produce your own film so you can show us how to do better! ? You want publicity Wilfred? there! Enjoy it! Well done @ynaija truly a ‘smart’ move ??? And of course it started with a cheeky ‘Omoni Oboli is bae’. News flash darling, I ain’t your bae! #SomethingMAJORIsComing #ChidOfGrace #TeamWinning #PettyThursday Ps: I saw some ‘constructive’ criticism of #WivesOnStrike and I took it on board.

A photo posted by Omoni Oboli (@omonioboli) on

While there’s been no word yet from Okiche, reactions have been trickling in from other sources. Critic, Oris Aigbokhaevbolo, criticized both the producer and the writer, saying Okiche undermined his own work with his choice of words. “How can you be taken seriously as a writer (of reviews or anything) by starting a piece of writing with these words, ‘Omoni Oboli is bae’?” he wrote in a tweet. “You can’t start a serious review with an apology. It weakens the prose, damns the piece, and becomes a weapon brandished by Ms Oboli,” he added.

Now to the attack. Can someone tell Ms Oboli that an ‘audience choice award’ hardly matters to an artist’s critical standing?” he later added, referencing “The First Lady’s” audience choice award win at the 2016 Nollywood Week Festival in Paris.

On his part, Y! Naija boss, Chude Jideonwo, backed his writer, saying Ms Oboli’s outburst was “small and dirty.” “The oldest trick in the book is to accuse a person of hating you because he/she disagrees with you. It’s small. It’s dirty. But then the world is full of small, silly, dirty people. Sadly, but surely,” he said in an Instagram post.

Omoni Oboli is not the first filmmaker to go after critics in the past few months. Director, Kunle Afolayan recently commented on the place of critics in Nollywood, where he expressed similar opinions to Ms. Oboli’s. “Who are you to say it could be better, when you’re not an authority, you’re not a director, you’re not a producer, you don’t even know nothing about film, but you just sit there and say ‘maybe it’s too dark, maybe the camera should have been from this place,” he said.